Montenegro’s Top Instagram-worthy Viewpoints

06th Apr 2018

With the same beauty of Croatia but without the crowds of visitors, Montenegro is the upcoming star of the Adriatic. This is why we added Tivat to our growing list of +45 destinations this year. There is so much to see and the weather is fantastic too with water temperatures of 86ºF in summer. With its beaches, coves, mountains and islands, we’ve suggested our recommended places to visit to get the best photographs of your charter…

Sailor’s Mosque, Ulcinj
Restored in 2012, the imposing Sailor’s Mosque is back as a landmark on the waterfront, and there can’t be many beaches with a mosque as a backdrop. Its Moorish origins go back to the 14th century and it was rebuilt in 1798 after the Battle of Krusi and dedicated to local sailors. You can explore the interior between prayers.

Sveti Stefan Islet
This exclusive resort is famous for its impressive cluster of terracotta-roofed whitewashed villas, surrounded by the Adriatic, except for a narrow slipway linking it to the mainland. From the water you can get an amazing view of this islet or head to the rooftop terrace of the Adrovic Hotel, off the E65, for a drink and a photo opportunity. If you want to visit Sveti Stefan, you will need a reservation at Nobu.

Sveti Nikola Island
A short hop from Sveti Stefan and Budvar, this small, uninhabited island makes a photographic statement with its steep incline of jagged rocks, which look like an iceberg emerging out of the sea. Known by the locals as the Hawaii of Montenegro, it boasts the clear, blue-green waters that the Adriatic is famous for. Beyond the rocky cliff faces, deer roam freely around the island.

Uvala Veslo, Luštica Peninsula
Sail across the bay from Herceg Novi to Uvala Veslo and the campsite Kamp Begovic, which sits on a largely undeveloped peninsula lined with ancient olive groves. Head to the cliffs at Veslo Bay for a wonderful view of the Adriatic and the bay’s natural, turquoise swimming pool. Many people cliff jump from here but beware of the rocks and the sea urchins on the seafloor. It’s a great spot for snorkeling and nearby there is a popular diving site with a 60-meter vertical drop to a sandy bottom.

Blue Grotto Cave, Luštica Peninsula
Head along the peninsula from Veslo Bay to the Blue Grotto Cave where, if you time it right, the sun hits the water and fills the cave with magnificent cobalt-blue light reflections. You can swim in the cave as long as you are happy in very deep water, and don’t forget your underwater camera. Avoid peak times, as the cave can become crowded with boats and the fumes can be overpowering. There is another cave nearby which is slightly darker and less busy. Sail onwards to Mamula Island, where you can see the old fort that became a prison camp in WWII and soon to be a luxury resort.

Perast’s church islands, Bay of Kotor
Visit this traditional town, which clings to the water’s edge at the foot of the daunting Balkan mountain range. With its creamy stone buildings, it has almost an Italian feel and you’ll be able to take some interesting photos of promenades flanked by mountains. Just offshore, there are two beautiful islands with churches, the 9th century Sveti Djordje or St George and 15th century Our Lady of the Rocks. Plan your visit to get the best light as the reflections on the water of the churches really make the perfect picture.

Kotor’s ancient city walls
Take the trek up the mountainside and tread the 1,350 steps of the 9th century upper town walls, stretching some 4.5km up the Balkan mountains. Once you get to St John’s Fortress at the top, you will be rewarded with the best view of Montenegro out over the city and right across the Bay of Kotor. It costs just a few Euros to visit the walls, but make sure you are in good health, have plenty of water and sturdy footwear before you set off. It’s a steep climb!

Learn more
View our fleet in Montenegro, or get in touch with our team. Email us at infona@dreamyachtcharter.com or give us a call at 855.650.8902.

coastline with houses and storesThe town of Perast in the Bay of Kotor